Sunday, 23 June 2013

Reinventing boys

Every boy at some point was confronted with that defining moment of genderquake-era life – when he had to put on his first dress. Some boys were overjoyed. Others, the more traditional ones, were less pleased.

12 comments:

  1. Looking forward to the 'after' shot, when he's had to adjust to his new look and role :)

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  2. he could become a nice eir stewardess, but where is his female pilot?

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  3. GREAT to see Boys in Dresses...Women Now NEED to Keep them in Skirts and Dresses and docile!!!

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  4. I'm a boy who has grown up in the Gynarchy so I have never not worn a dress. I cannot imagine wearing trousers as they are strictly for girls. My sisters sometimes tease me by saying boys used to wear trousers and were dominant and in charge of girls before the Genderquake, but I don't believe them. It would be awful not to be protected by strong girls and have to work hard at school to get a good job. We boys are not expected to do very well. I hope to work as a pa or secretary when I leave school...that is until I marry and have beautiful gynarchy children.

    SAMI

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  5. Thanks for the comments - appreciated.

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  6. I love going to Gynarchy High School. Being a boy there means we get spoilt. We are not expected to do well as we are taught at a lower level to the girls. For example I can do simple arithmetic but I cannot divide or do equations. It would be a surprise if I could. It's too advanced formy pretty brain. The girls are good to us and compliment us on our hair or our shapely figures. We giggle and thank them kindly. We aren't allowed to play with the girls at playtime or talk to them without permission. I can't even say hi to my sisters...they are so clever and bright. They are expected to go to Gynarchy University next year. When I leave school I'll go to a finishing school for young boys. There I'll learn how to set and keep a household budget, cook tasty meals and how to look after babies. I'm really looking forward to it.

    At the end of last term I upset my mother because I got a high grade in Gynarchy studies unexpectedly. I had to explain that I enjoyed it and had worked hard, but I'll be a good boy and fail at arithmetic and english language. This I did and I had to go to the headmistress and apologise for being above myself. It's a bad thing if us boys do too well in our studies. It means we think we are as good as the girls, which is ridiculous.

    Sami

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  7. I agree that Gynarchy High School is making great progress. At first us male pupils were annoyed at being placed in the "B" stream where we learn practical skills for home mkig rather than stydying for exams but I quickly adapted to the new regime.

    Us boys wear blouses and skirts to school while the girls wear the trousers (of course)The girls act as prefects and we are punished sverely for uniform infractions. I was given a dressing down in front of the whople school for having the cheek to wear brand name training shoes like the girls to games when boys are required to wear the much more becoming uniform white canvas plimsolls.

    i just received a good report for netball, home economics and deportment classes..)

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  8. I remember a day when boys were allowed to vote (but not run) for Class President. Those days are over, as the Gynarchy now considers gibing young boys voting roles in school is a dangerous political statement as it is inconsistent with their roles in society (I don't know what that means but I trust the Women to know better. I just heard the Prime Minister say that on TV. She is a very nice Lady and very respectful to boys. Her husband, the First Gentleman was a gorgeous Hollywood actor from the US but was send to Britain to marry the Prime Minister. He's so lucky!)

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    1. As no-one seems to have noticed the captions I did on the historical pictures ('Romantic Young Man' etc), I thought I would have a bash at the modern ones.

      Part I: Setting the Scene: The 2020 election caught everyone by surprise - perhaps even its winners. With the male vote divided between the traditional parties, the first-past-the-post electoral system meant that the 'Women First Party', which had huge support amongst women voters, obtained a landslide victory. The party itself was divided between the moderates, who relied on women's innate superiority to win out once the social and legal equality of the sexes had been established, and the radicals, who favoured more drastic laws, such as depriving men of the vote or putting married men's property into the hands of their wives. One radical piece of legislation which was passed was the 'Gendered Dress at Work Act'. This law said that those in positions of authority at work - say airline pilots or hospital consultants - were to dress in traditional male clothing whereas those beneath them - air hostesses or nurses - were to wear traditional feminine clothing. Commentators at first found it strange that a feminist party should pass such an act but its effect soon became apparent: where as women had long work trousers and shirts, many men men were now obliged to wear skirts or dresses for the first time. And with girls achieving better exam results than boys and increasingly being promoted to more high-status jobs (where, it was rumoured, they then favoured female applicants for other managerial posts), more and more boys were finding that starting work meant buying their first dress.

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  9. Imagine a young male department store manager, now supplanted by a younger woman, formerly his underling, as he shops now among the store's sharpest new skirt and blouse emsembles, under the smirking guidance of his new boss!

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  10. Ah...the delightful empowerment and joy Women experienced feeling total victory over the once haughty male sex now forever kept in proper feminized servitude... never again would society see males in any roles but those once forced upon the Female in the dark ages of unnatural 'masculine' male pretense.

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