Tuesday, 21 May 2013

Belgian royal couple



Léontine I was from July 1831 the first Queen of the Belgians, following Belgium’s independence from the Netherlands.



Husband of Queen Léontine I of the Belgians. Painted in 1841.




These two were begging to be done as a double portrait. So here they are united.

After Winterhalter. 

14 comments:

  1. hi jamie,
    iam your huge follower. can you pls have some indian role reversal sketches??

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    1. I've done a couple of ethnic minority subjects but not enough, and no Indian... Noted.

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    2. Lovely. Perhaps Lord Curzon in a sari?

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  2. My goodness - another great success. Transforming a KING into a passive, ringleted Victorian gentlewoman is especially amusing. His face fits perfectly with the hair and dress. And she looks smashing.

    I would love to see this as a film. King Leopold looking so magnificent and imposing in that gorgeous uniform, so powerful and assured and ready to rule his new nation. Very handsome man.

    Then the announcement is made - the world has changed. Say goodbye to the title of King. And your military career. And say goodbye to all of your clothes. That uniform is coming OFF. And to see his own wife gleefully dragging off his pumps and pulling off his breeches!

    No - you can't keep the sword. Or your own name. Your wife adapts your former name while you are now Charlie.

    No - you were never a General in the army. Just forget all about it.

    And you won't be cutting that hair. For a VERY long time. Don't look for your sword! And you won't be wearing boots again. We have to oil your hands and feet to soften them, so just relax! The Queen is meeting with the army now.


    Speaking of kings - I would love to see Spain's beautiful Prince Felipe out of his pinstripes and brogues and grow out his hair. But I don;t know if you do current royals.

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  3. The nineteeth-century portrait reversals are very well executed but are slightly in danger of becoming repetitive. If you added more of a caption to each one - in the fashion of the person who did the above comment - it would help distinguish them and would give them even more of an impact.

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    1. If viewers like to create a narrative for the pictures, then that's fine of course. And I know there's a mania for captions in the TG world. But captions would be no less repetitive - how many variations must one write on "here's a man who has to wear a dress"? The images speak for themselves.

      No one else is making art quite like this, so I'm happy just to keep creating the pictures.

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    2. Oh - I don't think they are becoming repetitive at all. They are great fun and quite original and unique.

      The creator of the pictures has been quite lenient with those of us who add little stories - which I appreciate - but they do indeed stand on their own.

      It just happens that my interest in 'transformed' gentlemen and monarchs is portrayed here. I love to think of it as being against their will, especially considering their former privileged status, but not everyone would see it that way.

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  4. il est vrai que si cela était la réalité, le pantalon allez bien mieux aux femmes qu'aux hommes.

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  5. http://kimballgray.deviantart.com/art/Storm-Gender-Swap-294299094

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  6. Hi Jamie,

    I would like to share with you a very shocking video from CNN. Apparently the collective subconsious is starting to scratch the surface of the things that Eve's Rib is so progressively talking about, even if it comes out in this weird ways, you really must watch:

    http://edition.cnn.com/video/?/video/bestoftv/2013/06/15/nr-blackwell-kosik-chicago-teen-pregnancy-ad.cnn

    Alex

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    1. Thanks Anonymous. The gender swapping I like to explore is cultural rather than biological. So male pregnancy isn't really part of what I do. But the video campaign in your link will probably cause a stir!

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  7. I know this one of of a queen but decided to adapt it as Part II of my story (see Romantic Young 2 for the first part). I hope my typing is more accurate this time!

    Francis looked on with pride as his son Robin had entered the dining room. His wife, Lady Belinda, had entrusted him with the task of organizing his son's eighteenth birthday party - she had been busy recently buying up a new factory to add to her business and had left the event to him, having every confidence in his ability to take care of such domestic tasks. The recently-passed Married Men's Property Act meant that the last vestige of male independence had been ended as the property of all husbands, even of wealthy heirs such as he had been,passed into the guardianship of their wives. Nevertheless, Francis knew that his wife was always willing to listen to his opinion: even if he knew that she would always have the last word. It was he who had picked out the dress which Robin was wearing - a slightly daring number which he knew would catch the eye of his guests. He had spent the day supervising Cook in the kitchen but had made sure to leave time to go upstairs to change for the party: Belinda expected him to look his best when they had company.He could no longer fit into wasp-waisted dress of the kind he had bought for his son's 'coming out' event but he knew he looked attractive in his red velvet gown, lace shawl and jewllery. He had insisted that his maid should get his curls and ribbons just right before he had come down to greet the guests. He knew the mixture of conflicitng emotions which his son must be going through: perhaps resentment at the new life that was being imposed on him and yet excitement at being the centre of attention; perhaps worried at the month of domestic drudgery which he knew awaited him from tomorrow and yet pleasure at the thought that he was beginning adult life at last. His wife caught his eye and smiled approvingly at him across the candleit room. She was happy with what he had achieved. The two of them slept in separate bedrooms but Francis was sure that she would be paying him a visit later, when all their guests had left...

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  8. Oh! This one is smashing! I love how well the red velvet draping at the neckline and soft ringlets contrast with his sharp features. I love these so much! I'd love to see some 1850s ones with some fancy beards/mustaches. I think the low neckline of a ballgown would show off a well-groomed bread beautifully!

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  9. Love this- Winterthaler's style somehow works really well in this context! I go to Brussels for work quite a bit so this Belgian fantasy is particularly entertaining

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